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Nano - Robin Cook.epub


Nano LLC is at the cutting edge of molecular manufacturing, developing minuscule nanorobots capable of clearing the human body of viruses and bacteria. But the institute is shrouded in secrets, and Pia is under strict orders to stay in her designated facility and ask no questions.




Nano - Robin Cook.epub


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Atta, Supriya; Beetz, Michael; Fabris, Laura (2019):Understanding the role of AgNO3 concentration and seed morphology in the achievement of tunable shape control in gold nanostars. In: Nanoscale, Vol. 11, No. 6: pp. 2946-2958


Comin, A.; Hartschuh, A. (2018):Efficient optimization of SHG hotspot switching in plasmonic nanoantennas using phase-shaped laser pulses controlled by neural networks. In: Optics Express, Vol. 26, No. 26: pp. 33678-33686 [PDF, 2MB]


Jovanović, Boris; Cvetković, Vladimir J.; Mitrović, Tatjana L. J. (2016):Effects of human food grade titanium dioxide nanoparticle dietary exposure on Drosophila melanogaster survival, fecundity, pupation and expression of antioxidant genes. In: Chemosphere, Vol. 144: pp. 43-49


Jovanović, Boris; Milošević, Djuradj; Stojković Piperac, Milica; Savić, Ana (2016):In situ effects of titanium dioxide nanoparticles on community structure of freshwater benthic macroinvertebrates. In: Environmental Pollution, Vol. 213: pp. 278-282


Kriegel, Franziska; Ermann, Niklas; Forbes, Ruaridh; Dulin, David; Dekker, Nynke H.; Lipfert, Jan (2017):Probing the salt dependence of the torsional stiffness of DNA by multiplexed magnetic torque tweezers. In: Nucleic Acids Research, Vol. 45, No. 10: pp. 5920-5929


McArdle, P.; Lahneman, D. J.; Biswas, Amlan; Keilmann, F.; Qazilbash, M. M. (2020):Near-field infrared nanospectroscopy of surface phonon-polariton resonances. In: Physical Review Research, Vol. 2, No. 2, 023272


Murschhauser, Alexandra; Roettgermann, Peter J. F.; Woschee, Daniel; Ober, Martina F.; Yan, Yan; Dawson, Kenneth A.; Raedler, Joachim O. (2019):A high-throughput microscopy method for single-cell analysis of event-time correlations in nanoparticle-induced cell death. In: Communications Biology, Vol. 2, 35


Saller, Kai B.; Riedl, Hubert; Lugli, Paolo; Koblmuller, Gregor; Tornow, Marc (2019):One-step transfer printing of patterned nanogap electrodes. In: Journal of Vacuum Science & Technology B, Vol. 37, No. 4, 040602


Schnitzler, Lukas G.; Junger, Stefanie; Loy, Dominik M.; Wagner, Ernst; Wixforth, Achim; Hoerner, Andreas; Laechelt, Ulrich; Westerhausen, Christoph (2019):Size tunable nanoparticle formation employing droplet fusion by acoustic streaming applied to polyplexes. In: Journal of Physics D-Applied Physics, Vol. 52, No. 24, 244002


Seitner, Maximilian J.; Ribeiro, Hugo; Kölbl, Johannes; Faust, Thomas; Kotthaus, Jörg P.; Weig, Eva M. (2016):Classical Stuckelberg interferometry of a nanomechanical two-mode system. In: Physical Review B, Vol. 94, No. 24, 245406


Strobl, F. G.; Czubak, D. M.; Wixforth, A.; Westerhausen, C. (2019):Ion controlled passive nanoparticle uptake in lipid vesicles in theory and experiment. In: Journal of Physics D-Applied Physics, Vol. 52, No. 29, 294001


A zinc oxide nanorod ammonia microsensor integrated with a readout circuit on-a-chip fabricated using the commercial 0.35 μm complementary metal oxide semiconductor (CMOS) process was investigated. The structure of the ammonia sensor is composed of a sensitive film and polysilicon electrodes. The ammonia sensor requires a post-process to etch the sacrificial layer, and to coat the sensitive film on the polysilicon electrodes. The sensitive film that is prepared by a hydrothermal method is made of zinc oxide. The sensor resistance changes when the sensitive film adsorbs or desorbs ammonia gas. The readout circuit is used to convert the sensor resistance into the voltage output. Experiments show that the ammonia sensor has a sensitivity of about 1.5 mV/ppm at room temperature.


The study presents a micro carbon monoxide (CO) sensor integrated with a readout circuit-on-a-chip manufactured by the commercial 0.35 μm complementary metal oxide semiconductor (CMOS) process and a post-process. The sensing film of the sensor is a composite cobalt oxide nanosheet and carbon nanotube (CoOOH/CNT) film that is prepared by a precipitation-oxidation method. The structure of the CO sensor is composed of a polysilicon resistor and a sensing film. The sensor, which is of a resistive type, changes its resistance when the sensing film adsorbs or desorbs CO gas. The readout circuit is used to convert the sensor resistance into the voltage output. The post-processing of the sensor includes etching the sacrificial layers and coating the sensing film. The advantages of the sensor include room temperature operation, short response/recovery times and easy post-processing. Experimental results show that the sensitivity of the CO sensor is about 0.19 mV/ppm, and the response and recovery times are 23 s and 34 s for 200 ppm CO, respectively. PMID:22294897


The study presents a micro carbon monoxide (CO) sensor integrated with a readout circuit-on-a-chip manufactured by the commercial 0.35 μm complementary metal oxide semiconductor (CMOS) process and a post-process. The sensing film of the sensor is a composite cobalt oxide nanosheet and carbon nanotube (CoOOH/CNT) film that is prepared by a precipitation-oxidation method. The structure of the CO sensor is composed of a polysilicon resistor and a sensing film. The sensor, which is of a resistive type, changes its resistance when the sensing film adsorbs or desorbs CO gas. The readout circuit is used to convert the sensor resistance into the voltage output. The post-processing of the sensor includes etching the sacrificial layers and coating the sensing film. The advantages of the sensor include room temperature operation, short response/recovery times and easy post-processing. Experimental results show that the sensitivity of the CO sensor is about 0.19 mV/ppm, and the response and recovery times are 23 s and 34 s for 200 ppm CO, respectively.


Modern imaging devices often require heterogeneous integration of different materials and technologies. Because of yield considerations, material availability, and various technological limitations, an extremely fine pitch is necessary to realize high-resolution images. Thus, there is a need for a hybridization technology that is able to join together readout amplifiers and pixel detectors at a very fine pitch. This paper describes radiation detector flip chip production at VTT. Our flip chip technology utilizes 25-μm diameter tin-lead solder bumps at a 50-μm pitch and is based on flux-free bonding. When preprocessed wafers are used, as is the case here, the total yield is defined only partly by the flip chip process. Wafer preprocessing done by a third-party silicon foundry and the flip chip process create different process defects. Wafer-level yield maps (based on probing) provided by the customer are used to select good readout chips for assembly. Wafer probing is often done outside of a real clean room environment, resulting in particle contamination and/or scratches on the wafers. Factors affecting the total yield of flip chip bonded detectors are discussed, and some yield numbers of the process are given. Ways to improve yield are considered, and finally guidelines for process planning and device design with respect to yield optimization are given.


The recent research in hybrid pixel detectors working in single photon counting mode focuses on nanometer or 3D technologies which allow making pixels smaller and implementing more complex solutions in each of the pixels. Usually single pixel in readout electronics for X-ray detection comprises of charge amplifier, shaper and discriminator that allow classification of events occurring at the detector as true or false hits by comparing amplitude of the signal obtained with threshold voltage, which minimizes the influence of noise effects. However, making the pixel size smaller often causes problems with pixel to pixel uniformity and additional effects like charge sharing become more visible. To improve channel-to-channel uniformity or implement an algorithm for charge sharing effect minimization, small area trimming DACs working in each pixel independently are necessary. However, meeting the requirement of small area often results in poor linearity and even non-monotonicity. In this paper we present a novel low-area thermometer coded 6-bit DAC implemented in 40 nm CMOS technology. Monte Carlo simulations were performed on the described design proving that under all conditions designed DAC is inherently monotonic. Presented DAC was implemented in the prototype readout chip with 432 pixels working in single photon counting mode, with two trimming DACs in each pixel. Each DAC occupies the area of 8 μm 18.5 μm. Measurements and chips' tests were performed to obtain reliable statistical results.


DNA analytics is a growing field based on the increasing knowledge about the genome with special implications for the understanding of molecular bases for diseases. Driven by the need for cost-effective and high-throughput methods for molecular detection, DNA chips are an interesting alternative to more traditional analytical methods in this field. The standard readout principle for DNA chips is fluorescence based. Fluorescence is highly sensitive and broadly established, but shows limitations regarding quantification (due to signal and/or dye instability) and the need for sophisticated (and therefore high-cost) equipment. This article introduces a readout system for an alternative detection scheme based on electrical detection of nanoparticle-labeled DNA. If labeled DNA is present in the analyte solution, it will bind on complementary capture DNA immobilized in a microelectrode gap. A subsequent metal enhancement step leads to a deposition of conductive material on the nanoparticles, and finally an electrical contact between the electrodes. This detection scheme offers the potential for a simple (low-cost as well as robust) and highly miniaturizable method, which could be well-suited for point-of-care applications in the context of lab-on-a-chip technologies. The demonstrated apparatus allows a parallel readout of an entire array of microstructured measurement sites. The readout is combined with data-processing by an embedded personal computer, resulting in an autonomous instrument that measures and presents the results. The design and realization of such a system is described, and first measurements are presented. 041b061a72


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