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Leg Sex Techniques


All over the world it is difficult to determine the sex of Guinea keets at day one of hatching. The aim of this study was to determine the sex of Guinea fowls at day-old. A total of 1176 pearl, lavender, black and white eggs were set in an incubator at the poultry unit of the department of animal science education, Mampong Campus. Keets were reared from day-old to four months. Data obtained from both morphometric traits (head width, head, neck, body, shank, tail, thigh and wattle lengths, helmet thickness, pelvic inlet, wing span, and leg length) and biometric traits (egg shape, swollen leg, stretched leg, sound, wattle and phallus) were measured at day-old and at four months and analyzed using the General Linear Model Procedure of the Statistical Analysis System (SAS) and Chi square test. Males and females did not differ in all morphometric traits measured at day one of hatching, indicating that sexual dimorphism had not taken place at that age using morphometric techniques. However, at four months, neck, body, shank and wattles llengths in males were longer than in female counterparts. The helmet in males was also thicker than in females. However, females had wider pelvic inlet than males. At day-old, swollen leg technique indicated 52% and 48% expected males and females, and at four months there were 52.8% and 47.2% observed males and females, respectively. Results from stretched leg technique showed 56% and 44% expected males and females at day old, and 52.8% and 47.2% males and females, respectively, were observed at four months. In conclusion, the swollen and stretched leg techniques are effective in sexing Guinea fowls at day-old while at four months the use of sound, wattles and phallus techniques yielded good results.




leg sex techniques



Males show the phallus when they are four weeks old but females do not (Idahor and Akinola 2015; Teye and Gyawu 2001). Iddriss et al (2015) also observed that from four weeks old and beyond, males had bigger wattles than females while the opposite was true for the width of pelvic inlet. In spite of the various methods of sexing Guinea fowls developed by some researchers, none was able to sex Guinea fowls at day one. Evidence gathered from farmers in the Sekyere South District of the Ashanti Region indicates that Guinea fowls can be sexed at day-old using swollen leg and stretched led techniques. The justification of this research work is to help farmers in early separation of males from females to provide enough space for the growth of pullets to prevent precocious mating. The aim of this study was to determine the sex of Guinea fowls at day-old using biometric and morphometric traits


There was no difference (p > 0.05) between expected males and females, and observed males and females using the egg shape, swollen leg and stretched leg techniques, sound, wattles and phallus to differentiate between the sexes using different techniques for sexing Guinea fowls (Table 1).


It was observed that males did not differ significantly (p > 0.05) from their female counterparts at day-old using swollen leg (Plate 2) and non-swollen leg (Plate 3) technique (Table 1). It was also observed that in both stretched legs (Plate 4) non-stretched leg technique (Plate 5), males did not differ significantly (p > 0.05) from their female counterparts. The observations from both swollen/non-swollen and stretched/non-stretched legs techniques indicated higher males than their females counterparts. Scientists have concluded that it is difficult to determine the sex of Guinea keets at day one of age, unless they are about 8 weeks old (Iddriss et al 2015; Teye and Gyawu 2001).


Results obtained from morphometric traits measured at day one of hatching indicated that males did not differ significantly (p > 0.05) from females in head width, head, body, neck, shank, leg and wing lengths, and pelvic inlet (Table 2). These indicate that sexual dimorphism had not taken place at that age using morphometric techniques. In consonance with Moreki and Mack (2013), it was very difficult to sex Guinea fowls at day-old since males and females all look exactly the same morphologically. Similarly, Ikani and Dafwang (2004) reported that it is difficult to differentiate between the sexes at day-old since there is no difference in their appearance.


Even if a position worked with a previous partner, that might not be the case with the next. Different sizes, different techniques, and changing bodies and tastes are just some of the things we contend with when it comes to sex.


Since in women the movements of the penis in and out do not stimulate the clitoral glans continuously, women have discovered the "rocking" movement technique. A study of over 3000 American women found that 76% of women use the technique because they find it sexually arousing, while the penis is in their vagina and barely moving, to rub their clitoris against the base of the penis.[59] Rocking is among the techniques that allow a man to mitigate the rise of his arousal, because the penis receives little friction. Unless he suffers from premature ejaculation, he can thus prevent the orgasm in himself while promoting arousal in the woman.[60] This technique is known as the coital alignment technique.


Many techniques have been described to facilitate primary closure of fasciotomy sites, including placing vascular loops in a zigzagged fashion across the fasciotomy site. This may help to slowly close the wound by gradually tensioning the incision with the vessel loops. 041b061a72


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